2011 NFL HOF Class Won’t Break the Bank

When you looked over the list of those eligible for the 2011 Pro Football Hall of Fame induction ceremony, you really couldn’t argue against too many of the choices. Perhaps that’s why this year’s class is so large at seven new members.

The list includes Ed Sabol, who formed NFL Films, who is the only non-player among the bunch.

The players include Chris Hanburger, Les Richter, Richard Dent, Deion Sanders, Shannon Sharpe and Marshall Faulk. That’s a lot of defense and some flashy offense. With these players spanning several decades between them, vales for their collectibles range wildly. Unfortunately, Richter died in 2010, so Hall of Fame collectors will have to look for already established pieces in hunting down his signature.

But let’s take a look at values for the newest Hall of Famers, including Sabol, whose market is relatively small compared to the others. However, upon a closer look, Sabol signed mini-helmets bring $250-$300 and signed index cards can be had for about $90.

Richard Dent
Dent was the defensive stalwart for the Chicago Bears during the team’s run through the 1980s, including the 1985 Super Bowl-winning team in which he was named MVP. Dent played for three other teams in the tailend of his career, but he is a Chicago Bear through and through.

When it comes to his collectibles, this might be an anomaly, but a Dent signed, game-used Chicago Bears helmet from the 1984-85 season has sold for $1,200. After that, Dent is a cheap date, with signed footballs and jerseys all around $100. When it comes to cards, his Leaf Certified Fabric of the Game autographed cards are in the $60-$70 range.

Marshall Faulk
Faulk was the most dynamic player in the game during his time with the Indianapolis Colts and St. Louis Rams, eclipsing 2,000 yards from scrimmage in four straight seasons. He ranks in the Top 10 in career rushing yards and yards from scrimmage.

Faulk is rather valuable on the secondary market thanks to his running back status and hitting the right time in the trading card bonanza with some rare rookie cards.

Game-used Faulk jerseys can top $1,200, but then the rookie cards come into play. A 1994 SP Die Cut Foil Faulk rookie card, graded BGS 9.5 had sold for $600, but most are far less in value. Signed, full-size helmets are selling for $300, but signed jerseys, including San Diego State examples, can be had for less than $125.

Chris Hanburger
The Washington Redskins linebacker was a nine-time Pro Bowler from 1965-78. His 1971 Kellogg’s card, graded PSA 10, has hit $180, but signed jerseys are on the market for less than $100. Signed full-size helmets are hitting around $70.

Les Richter
Another great linebacker, Richter was named to eight straight Pro Bowl teams and never missed a game in his career.
Having played from 1954-62, Richter has an advantage on other members of this class in that his trading cards are highly coveted thanks to their vintage. His 1952 Bowman Large No, 61 card is the one to have, with a PSA 8 example having sold for $732.
That’s the high end, with PSA 7 examples settling around $190 and then down from there for lesser grades. Signed index cards tops out at $90.

Deion Sanders
 The brash and very talented cornerback owned the NFL in the 1990s as a shut-down cornerback and kick returner. The only thing bigger than his game was his mouth. Should be a fun acceptance speech.

On the collectibles side, Sanders is rather cheap, with signed jerseys topping out at $250. Signed 1990 rookie cards are fetching $150, with signed footballs going for slightly less.

Shannon Sharpe
While nothing is sexy about a tight end, Sharpe did lead the NFL in career reception, receiving yards and touchdowns for a tight end at the time of his retirement, and he still looks like he can play football.

His signed jerseys are available for less than $200, and if you have a 1990 Action Packed rookie, graded Gem Mint 10, you can get the same price. The rest of his collectibles are well under $100.

So there’s a quick glimpse at values of the 2011 Pro Football Hall of Fame class on the secondary market. Happy hunting.

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts

Leave a Reply