Change is the operative word

We promised a long, enjoyable look at The National Convention in Atlantic City, N.J. I don’t think we disappointed in that regard in this issue. In these pages, you’ll find three different perspectives of the show. From two contributors touring the show floor to another who goes on a one-day mission to fill his want-list and meet up with old friends. All three spent a lot of time scouring booths, and you’ll find that hardly any of their stories overlap. What does that tell you? The scope of the hobby and The National itself is quite vast. It includes a wide variety of memorabilia, stories and people involved that would take weeks to fully explore. Every booth has a story, from its contents to the personal histories of the buyers and sellers. That’s what makes this Hobby so fun and unique.

.es, the current high prices for high-grade vintage cards is remarkable. But, I certainly hope that monetary value isn’t the only reason you are involved in the Hobby. If you’re reading these words, that probably isn’t fully the case because we try to convey the Hobby on a personal level. That also involves information, interviews and stories that go far beyond perceived value.

While many things change in this market, from perceived scarcity, values and the flavor of the day, it’s the connection between people and sports that still drives the heart of this Hobby. And I hope that is something that never changes.

Changing Tides

And speaking of change, there will be a change at SCD going forward. Before you get too excited, everything regarding SCD remains the same (frequency, size, etc.); but, after this issue, I will no longer be the editor of this fine publication.

I have elected to pursue another opportunity, but I do not leave easily. This is likely the longest-tenured position in my working life. One that I fancied myself in when I decided to make journalism a career choice way back in middle school.

I was recently asked why I pursued journalism in school. I said I grew up reading Sports Illustrated as a child and marveled at how some stories could really move you. I wanted to have the same impact. Now, I don’t have the writing abilities of SI’s renown stable of contributors, but thankfully, I believe we have featured a number of writers over the years who are on that level, and as an editor, I couldn’t ask for anything better.

The role of the SCD editor has changed dramatically even in the nearly six years I’ve been at the helm, with more and more duties that don’t always involve the actual magazine to accomplish along the way. There are things you always wish you could do better or spend more time on, but the publishing world dictates a different course these days.

I also appreciate the support along the way. I was not an everyday hobby guy with vast knowledge of cards sets and signatures. I believe many of you have realized that. But for the most part that was accepted as long as the information was still put forth accurately and in an entertaining manner.

The 2016 National reinforced to me that the true collectors in the Hobby are some of the nicest folks you’ll meet. While the dark side of the Hobby can creep in, the Hobby’s backbone is strong and should weather whatever comes to the forefront in the future.
I thank you all for the support and encouragement over the years.

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