Jackie Robinson Glove Brings $373,000, Bat Hits $114,000

A rare Jackie Robinson baseball glove worn in the Brooklyn Dodgers 1955 and 1956 World Series (his final season) sold for $373,002 on the Steiner Sports Memorabilia “Ground Breaking” auction.

Jackie glove netted $373,000 in a Steiner Sports auction.

Jackie glove netted $373,000 in a Steiner Sports auction.

Another vintage Robinson artifact, a game-used Jackie Robinson Model Louisville Slugger bat, authenticated and believed to be from the 1956 season, sold for $114,000.

Yankee icon Mickey Mantle’s original 1960 signed contract fetched $39,930, with proceeds donated to Hurricane Sandy New Jersey Relief Fund by the sons of the Yankee great, Danny and David Mantle, on behalf of the Mantle family.

A 1924 World Series ticket signed by such immortals as Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, John McGraw and Walter Johnson, as well as the 30th President of the United States Calvin Coolidge and the first Commissioner of Baseball, Kenesaw Mountain Landis, sold for $15,000.

The Robinson glove is considered one of the most historic artifacts from the career of the immortal Robinson was only recently discovered. Authenticator Dennis Esken, who is renowned in the industry, had said: “This rare gem is the only Jackie Robinson glove known to exist.  It was discovered in New York City tucked away in a garage, wrapped in plastic. The glove shows extensive wear and aging on the leather attributed to three years of use. The photo match and the ability to see the Rawlings labels aided me in getting the exact date of the glove.  One of the highlights in this BD model glove is Jackie’s iconic jersey number ‘42’ written in black felt tip on the intact wrist strap also, signifying that this glove belonged to him as proven by the ‘42’ pictured in the photo match.”

The Louisville Slugger Jackie Robinson Professional Model Bat, believed to be from the 1956 season, was authenticated by John Taube and Vince Malta from PSA/DNA and is graded a GU 9. A letter of authenticity states the bat matches records of Robinson’s Louisville Slugger orders and even carries streaks of paint from the bat rack in the Dodger dugout at Ebbets Field.

“My mom (Merlyn) deserves all the credit for saving my father’s contracts in a file cabinet to preserve them,” says Danny Mantle.  “The 1960 contract is in near perfect condition and looks brand new. We watch all those people living in tents, and decided to take the contract and put it to good use to raise some money for the victims.”

The contract is signed by “The Mick” and Henry Roy Hamey, a long-time employee of the Yankees who he reached the pinnacle of his career when he was appointed the
general manager in November 1960. Although he inherited a pennant winner from his predecessor, George Weiss, Hamey maintained the Yankee standard. He produced
three additional American League champions and two World Series champions in his three full seasons in the GM chair, before retiring in the autumn of 1963.

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